LXXIX. The First Disciples.

JOHN i. 40-41. “One
of the two which heard John speak, and followed him, was
Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother. He first findeth his own
brother Simon, and saith unto him, We have found the Messias,
which is, being interpreted, the Christ. And he brought him to
Jesus.”

ANDREW, the open-hearted, the believing, the benevolent,
should be the true type of all Christian brotherhood now.
Can there be a finer pattern, save that of the Holy One
Himself, to put before the Churches of the present day?
He is presented to us in a threefold aspect.
I. Andrew is presented to us in the first place as the
earnest seeker after salvation. His mind had evidently
been prepared by a course of previous training. He was
prepared to respond to the summons, “Behold the Lamb.”
He allowed himself to be hindered by no false shame or
proud reserve, and was rewarded by arriving at the grand-
est conviction of his life. We must imitate him, not only
in the open-heartedness of his character, not only in his
freedom from prejudice, but in the indomitable earnest-
ness which once upon the track of the inquiry fails not to
pursue it to the end.
II. We see Andrew as a satisfied believer in Jesus, exult-
ing in the consciousness of the discovered Messiah. There
are two things which are presented to us here for our con-
sideration : the open-heartedness and the satisfactoriness of
Christianity. There is no disguise about Christianity—
“Behold the Lamb.” This is the essential difference
between the false and the true in religion. Then, when we
are asked to come and see, we may be sure that there is
always something to be seen; that there is no delusion
in the invitation, that there is no false promise in the
summons.
III. Andrew is presented to us as the energetic
missionary. He is eager to communicate tidings of the
joy that has come to him, and he is fain to seek out the
companion of his infancy, the partner of his daily toil, and
invite him to share the blessing.
Contrast the two first brothers of the Old Testament
with the two first brothers of the New.
W. Morley. Punshon, D.D.