XV. The Mutual Confession of Christ and His Disciples.

MATT. x. 32. “Whosoever, therefore, shall
confess Me before men, him will I confess also before My Father
which is in heaven.”

FAMILIAR words these, but very wonderful words. How
astonished should we be if we heard these words from the
lips of another. Is there is another being who could dare
to speak thus?
To confess, as in the text, is to speak openly of anything
according to its true character.
We have in this passage two confessions.
I. The confessing of Christ by men.
Before we can speak openly of Christ according to His
true character we must know Him and we must appreciate
Him. Knowledge and appreciation are both essential to
this confession.
This confession is variously made. Sometimes it is a
verbal acknowledgment of Christ. Sometimes Christ may
be dishonoured by our speaking of Him with our mouths;
and we require wisdom and prudence and the exercising of
judgment in this matter.
Again, Jesus Christ is confessed by the observance of His
ordinances. In baptism we especially confess the Holy
Spirit, in the Lord’s supper we confess the Saviour. How
is it that some who really do live by faith on the Son of
God still neglect this sacrament?
Christ is confessed by the recognition of His disciples
and servants, specially of such as most represent Him—the
children of sorrow.
Jesus Christ is confessed by the worship of His holy
name.
Christ is confessed by the endurance of shame and
persecution for His sake.
Finally, He is confessed by living to Him and living
for Him.
II. The confessing of men by Jesus Christ
The two are connected.
The confessing of men by Christ is both present and
future. Now men are confessed by His providences and
the ministry of His Spirit. Then He will openly confess
them before His Father and the assembled world.
This recognition is full and complete both now and
hereafter.
There are two practical lessons.
1. Secret discipleship can never fulfil our duties or ex-
haust our obligations.
2. The trials involved in the confession of Christ are
light and momentary compared with the weight of the
reward.
Samuel Martin